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THE PORT OF LIVORNO  Maritime Postal History by Alan BECKER
Country: TUSCANY
Condition: THE PORT OF LIVORNO Maritime Postal History by Alan BECKER
Description: Alan Becker, The Port of Livorno - A Survey of its Maritime Postal History -- 17th to the 20th Centuries. in English, 74 pages (A4) spiral bound, color illustrations throughout. *************** This book brings together into one volume the current knowledge of the postal history of the port of Livorno. Although touched on in several other more general works, the last book covering this specific subject was published some 50 years ago. The Author is a long-time specialist of Livorno’s maritime mail postal history with related extensive collections on the various aspects. In 1676 Livorno was officially declared a free port, thus consolidating a pre-existing situation that dated back to the 1500s. During the ensuing decades many foreigners settled in Livorno forming sizable communities of French, Jewish, Dutch, Greek, Armenian and Levantine expatriates. In due course Livorno became the most important seaport of the Mediterranean, especially for importation of salted fish, cereals and grains. The Author begins with the 1600s mail of the Medici era which illustrates the great postal interaction the port had with import-export traders all over the Mediterranean and throughout Italy and Northern Europe. The end of the Medici dynasty and the inception of the Habsburg-Lorraine dynasty characterized the 1700s; these were the years that saw the post office revenue increase substantially. By the end of the 1700s, although the port’s traffic is said to have slowed down, Livorno was attracting an average 5,000 ships of all kinds and descriptions each year. Contemporaries described it as a chronically crowded port. The British had warehouses and their presence was rather important since Livorno imported spices, fabrics and manufactured goods from Britain; at the same time it exported to Britain silk, wine, olive oil, olives, cumin, straw hats, cheese, capers, camel and goat’s hair etc. The Napoleonic period brought the first maritime postmark “COLONIES PAR/LIVOURNE” and a better organized postal service. The Lorraine Grand Duke was restored in 1814; from a postal history viewpoint the 1820s, 30s and 40s, saw greater maritime traffic and with it more mail and more maritime mail postmarks. In 1843, provenance, instructional, routing and accessory hand-stamps were introduced for mail carried to Livorno by French Navy Steamers. Indeed, Becker visits all aspects of maritime mail and succeeds in presenting a clear picture of a rather complex subject matter. The 1859 Second War of Independence inflicted a severe blow on Austria and Tuscany went through a Provisional Government followed by a plebiscite that confirmed the wish of the people to have the Grand Duchy become part of the Kingdom of Italy. The transition period resulted in the adoption of Provisional Government stamps followed by those of the 4th issue of the Kingdom of Sardinia and later on those of the Kingdom of Italy. This is reflected on the covers of the time which become even more interesting with maritime mail postmarks. Mail disinfection was a major task for Livorno’s four lazarettos; they certainly were busy with bigger tasks but the postal aspect was one that was at the top of the priority list of health authorities. From the 1600s to the 1800s the lazarettos were the first to handle and disinfect incoming mail. Becker examines health passports - a corollary collecting area that appeals to specialists of disinfected mail. The steamers’ age saw the opening of French, Sardinian and Neapolitan steamship agencies in Livorno. The Grand Duchy launched the Tuscan Steamship Company in 1834 with a fleet of two vessels operating routes to Genoa, Naples and Sicily. Many hand-stamps of the agencies used on their mail feature a steamship making them particularly endearing to postal historians. With so many ships arriving every day of the week at Livorno, the port was also a major mail sorting hub; the lion’s share was secured by forwarding agents - 160 of them so far recorded as operating at Livorno. Their activity is documented by their endorsements on the letters and in many cases by the use of hand-stamps. The book ends with a very useful catalogue of cancellations used on maritime mail, and hand-stamps and seals used on disinfected mail. The English-speaking reader has now the opportunity to benefit from information and research not available before in his/her language. The Author is well aware of the needs of those who would venture in a rather complex field. A one town postal history with focus on maritime mail may look like an easy task, but experienced collectors will tell you differently. In this specific case we have a cosmopolitan town and port interacting with North Africa, Mediterranean islands, the Near East, Turkey, France and quite a number of countries in Europe. This is a fascinating book and an eye-opener for those who want to venture into new areas of research and collecting. [Reviewed by Giorgio Migliavacca]
Price: $58.00
Item Id #013104    See Details...
ITALY VATICAN SAN MARINO COLONIES & OCCUPATIONS POSTAL STATIONERY CATALOG 2011
Country: ITALY
Condition: ITALY VATICAN SAN MARINO COLONIES & OCCUPATIONS POSTAL STATIONERY CATALOG 2011
Description: IN ITALIAN AND ENGLISH!! HIGH QUALITY PAPER, LAVISHLY PRODUCED 392 PAGES COLOR ILLUSTRATED THROUGHOUT UPDATED EVALUATIONS INCLUDES ITALY, ITALIAN STATES, ITALIAN COLONIES, OCCUPIED TERRITORIES WORLD WAR I & WORLD WAR II TRENTO * TRIESTE * DALMATIA * AEGEAN ISLANDS * LUBIANA * VENEZIA GIULIA * FIUME * ISTRIA ITALIAN POST OFFICES ABROAD (ALBANIA, CHINA, EGYPT, CRETE,TUNISIA) ITALIAN COLONIES SAN MARINO * VATICAN * SOVEREIGN MILITARY ORDER OF MALTA * ITALIANA: FOREIGN POSTAL STATIONERY WITH ITALIAN TEXTS AND/OR CONNECTIONS this is a "WOW" book BUY IT NOW & YOU WILL BE GLAD WE SHIP WORLDWIDE
Price: $78.00     Sale Price! $58.00
Item Id #003630    See Details...
Fiume 1918—1924—I servizi postali e la filatelia * BY OLIVIERO - HEAVY BOOK check out postage costs
Country: FIUME
Condition: Fiume 1918—1924—I servizi postali e la filatelia * BY EMOROSO - 5 pounds BOOK read carefully for postage costs
Description: ******** LAST COPIES IN STOCK **** THIS BOOK IS NOW OUT OF PRINT IN ITALY **** VERY IMPORTANT * WHEN BUYING THIS BOOK IGNORE THE AUTOMATIC $10 charge [we will send you a Paypal invoice or equivalent for the exact amount] -THIS IS a 5 Pounds PACKET- *** SHIPPING COSTS: TO USA $24 ** TO CANADA $43 ** TO OTHER COUNTRIES IN THE AMERICAS & EUROPE $55 ** AFRICA, AUSTRALIA, ASIA & FAR EAST $65 *********** Fiume 1918—1924—I servizi postali e la filatelia tra vicende storiche e vita di tutti i giorni, by Oliviero Emoroso, Published 2013, by the Author. Perfect bound 8 1/4” x 11 3/4”, card cover, 424 pages, in Italian, hundreds of colour illustrations. Available from: Virginstamps.com PO Box 7007, St. Thomas, VI 00801-0007 USA (issun@candwbvi.net) Two years ago I heard through the grapevine that a Croatian specialist was publishing a new book on the stamps of Fiume, and a website on the same topic was supposed to be launched by the same person. “Fra il dire e il fare c’è di mezzo il mare” (between words and deeds there is a sea) is an Italian adage that I have learned the hard way that it is true. Philatelic publishing is not a money-making venture, it is an expression of love, an ideal way of sharing one’s knowledge for many years to come, while promoting our favourite hobby. The latest news is that the Croatian specialist is finally putting his last touches to both website and book. Others, however, seem to have been working on similar pursuits with impressive results. It is always a pleasure to hold in one’s hands a new book on the stamps and postal history of Fiume, especially this massive new volume by Emoroso. The first attempt to make a listing of these intriguing stamps came with the Fiume chapter of the Catalogo Storico e Descrittivo dei francobolli d’Italia published in 1923, under the supervision of the great Emilio Diena, based on information provided by the top brass of the Fiume Philatelic Society, Vincenzo Antoniazzo and Umberto Riccotti. In 1981, I published a reprint of this section of the first scientific catalogue of the Italian area. The Fiume listings were deemed incomplete and not reliable by contemporaries (see Rivista Filatelica d’Italia, July 1924, p. 204-5). To complicate things, the bad publicity about the endless number of forged overprints and forged stamps, compounded by the apparent difficulties in deciphering the six hand overprints was a big deterrent. The few articles written on the subject were in Italian and occasionally in German; finally, in 1958, Guglielmo Oliva published his Razionale Catalogazione dei Francobolli di Fiume which was a far from complete compendium that provided a solid starting point and a definite blueprint for other catalogues to build on. Oliva had also written some good articles on the subject. However, the language barrier, technicalities, missing pieces of the puzzle, and intricacies were eased during the 1970s and 1980s when Roy Dehn began to publish a series of articles on Fiume in Italian and British magazines. This was indeed a breath of fresh air and the feedback was so positive that in 1998, Dehn published his handbook and compendium The Stamps and Postal History of Fiume 1600-1924 which remains a cornerstone of the literature on these stamps. In the meantime, Francesco Carlotto had published a well-researched series of articles on the postal history of Fiume (Nuovo Corriere Filatelico, and Bollettino prefilatelico e storico postale, 1983-4). Finally there was light at the end of the tunnel, some cadavers had come out of the closet and information jealously held back in some quarters began to circulate. In 2006, Ivan Martinas, a Croatian expertiser, published his 250-page bilingual (Croatian-English) catalogue Stamps of Rijeka, Fiume 1918-1924 — yes, you read correctly 250 pages! Immediately after, in February 2007, C.E.I. published Carlo Ciullo’s Fiume: Sintesi Prefilatelica e Storico-Postale — a book that was an eye opener for Italian collectors resulting in many cobwebs being removed and quite a few myths unveiled. Fil-Italia, the Italy & Colonies Study Circle quarterly, during the course of its 40 years has published many articles on Fiume, especially about postmarks and postal history aspects. As a result, in 2007 the ICSC published a volume by John F. Gilbert titled The Postmarks of Fiume 1809-1945, and in 2009 a sequel by the same Author titled The Postmarks of the Province of Fiume, 1924-1943 including precursors followed. Having examined the major bibliographic entries on Fiume, it will be useful to the reader who is not too familiar with Fiume to spend a couple minutes on a brief outline of its history and philatelic ramifications. At the end of World War One the Croatian port of Fiume (now called Rijeka) on the east side of the Northern Adriatic Sea became the subject of controversy between the new nation of Yugoslavia and Italy. Fiume’s origins go back to Roman times when it was called “Tarsatica” or “Terra Fluminis Sancti Viti” (the river-land of St Vitus); Fiume, in fact, means river. In 1465, the Waldsee dynasty came to an end and the Habsburgs inherited Fiume from them. This was a valuable acquisition since it gave Austria a much needed outlet on the sea. It later became Hungary’s only major port when it was annexed to that country in 1776 by a decree of Empress Maria Theresa. In 1809, Fiume was incorporated into the Napoleonic province of Illyria, but in 1814 it was returned to Austria, and eight years later assigned to Hungary. In 1848, despite the city’s adverse feelings to ‘Croatisation’, it became part of the Croatian Crownland. In 1870 the postal network was controlled by Hungary. Stamps of Austria were used at Fiume until 1871 when Hungarian stamps were introduced. The secret Treaty of London (26 April 1915) envisaged Fiume becoming part of Croatia, while Italy was to annex Dalmatia. Things went differently, and when the “October Revolution” forced Russia to withdraw, Italy found herself bearing the burden. Thus, expectations of greater rewards were fuelled by public opinion, and while Dalmatia had only marginal connections with Italy, Fiume had a strong ethnic presence of Italians. The suburb of Susak had 11,000 Croats and 1,500 Italians, but the rest of Fiume was said to have 22,488 Italians and 13,351 Croats. On 28 October 1918, the Italian flag was raised on the Civic Tower of Fiume (A4 type: Scott 30-32; SG 36) heralding the strong wind of change. Two days later a plebiscite called for annexation to Italy, and an inter-Allied force (British, French and American) had to intervene to prevent a clash. From a strictly postal viewpoint, the “de facto” Italian annexation resulted in the overprinting of stocks of Hungarian stamps with the name “FIUME” in capital letters. This operation was carried out by letterpress for the post office stocks and by hand for part sheets or single stamps, as well as similar stamps that the public was returning to the post office in order to obtain the new ones. The provisional (overprinted) issue of Fiume (Scott 1-23; SG 1-28) is familiar to specialists for its complexities. Many of these stamps are known to have two distinct types of letterpress overprints and as many as six distinct types of hand overprints. Forgeries abound, but Fiume overprints, as Dehn explained in his monograph, are not exceedingly difficult to assess once some genuine reference copies of each overprint are acquired. Eventually Rome twisted the arm of the Allies and on 22 February 1923 (Scott 184-195; SG 217-224) Fiume was annexed to Italy. The process had been far from painless as it involved the highly embarrassing intervention of Gabriele d’Annunzio - a charismatic hero, poet, aviator, and seducer with a penchant for flamboyance - and his “Arditi” paramilitary force. After the Rapallo Treaty was signed (11 November 1920) it became necessary to get rid of the belligerent poet-hero and his Legionari and on Christmas Eve the battleship Andrea Doria shelled d’Annunzio headquarters and his men capitulated. Between December 1918 and March 1924 (“Annessione” set: Scott 196-207, SG 225-238) Fiume had issued no less than 280 stamps. This figure (which is taken from Sassone - the standard Italian catalogue) excludes the Legionari stamps overprinted for the offshore islands of Arbe and Veglia (now known as Rab and Krk respectively). With virtually no exception all the series issued by Fiume between 1918 and 1923 have been forged. The proliferation of these forgeries was fuelled in the post World War One years when demand for “war stamps” was at its peak. The 1918-1924 issues of Fiume have witnessed a great revival in popularity during the last 30 years. The specialist’s appetite is greater than ever and the advanced collector is always on the lookout for something impressive to add to his collection. The “unique” 1920 d’Annunzio “Pro Fondazione” 15c. soi-disant stamp was until recent times Fiume’s most elusive acquisition. Recent research has proved that the stamp is not “unique” and that some books, a philatelic encyclopedia, some Italian catalogues, and a few over-zealous auctioneers had been deceived by d’Annunzio’s lie. The stamp depicting the poet wearing a lancers beret to disguise his bald head was welcomed by d’Annunzio but was not readily available to the general public. Until recently only one cover with this semi-stamp was known; it was autographed by d’Annunzio himself to give it the needed “pedigree” and attest its “uniqueness”. In due course the cover was auctioned for 50,000 Lire (or today’s equivalent of $35,000). In recent times two postcards with the same unique d’Annunzio stamp have surfaced on the market; needless to say, the perspective buyers feared that many more would come out of the drawer and one such item offered at auction with an estimate of $3,000 found no buyers. To clear d’Annunzio’s reputation from allegations of getting rich at the expense of stamp collectors, suffice it to say that the proceeds from the sale of the “unique” stamp were donated to a Fiume welfare institution. After a few weeks of life the 1920 Legionari issue (Scott type A12; SG type M17) was overprinted and all the Lira denominations were handstamped on the gummed side with the emblem of the Arditi - a snake swallowing its own tail symbolizing eternity and Rome the eternal city. As would be expected, this overprint has been forged causing great concern among collectors. Unfortunately the Arditi handstamp, or backprint, is not illustrated in major catalogues, except for Catalogo Enciclopedico Italiano and Michel. But such illustrations are of little help to the collector who wants to detect forged backprints. This critical information is now available in both Dehn’s handbook and Emoroso’s monograph. With the advent of the Fascist party to power, the 1920 Rapallo Treaty, which envisaged a free state of Fiume-Rijeka with an Italo-Fiuman-Yugoslav consortium for the port, was ignored despite the fact that such a solution had been approved by the Fiuman electorate on 24 April 1921. Benito Mussolini’s pressures resulted in a new Italo-Yugoslav treaty (Rome, 27 January, 1924) recognizing Fiume itself as Italian while Susak was given to Yugoslavia. Emoroso’s book is a dream come true, no exaggeration at all. In 32 well-articulated chapters the Author gives us an in-depth survey of all the stamp issues of Fiume. It is a work of love indeed and one of the reasons is that the family roots of the Como-based Author are in Fiume. The Author points out that all too often philatelists are jealous of their knowledge but — he insists — when it comes to Fiume stamps “it is best to relinquish our protectiveness of petty interests and divulge as much as possible every aspect of our knowledge, thereby creating confidence and promoting interest for this collecting area. This is the only way to disperse the fog and the fear that surround it.” No wonder, that with such a philosophy he has given us an unprecedented amount of information. As stated in the title of the book, ample information on the history of Fiume and day-to-day life is provided so that the reader can land on the philatelic and postal aspect with good knowledge of what was happening. From the outset, Emoroso deals with the first overprint — the large sans-serif provisional type — examining all the evidence and the conflicting reports, as well as the flip-flops of the experts. As you finish reading chapter II you may wonder what is coming in later chapters because this Author seems to leave no stones unturned. In fact, he does that relentlessly and passionately. Two chapters, 21 pages, deal with the Machine overprint I and II on the Reapers and Parliament definitive stamps of Hungary as well on the War Charity stamps, the 2 filler newspaper stamp, and the postage due stamps. Chapter V takes another 20 pages for the six types of hand overprints which brings back memories of when after acquiring the Riccotti collection of Fiume - and a few years later the Bernardelli one - I often went to visit the much revered Milanese expert Commendator Fiecchi who had his office in an hotel room a few yards (yes yards) away from the Cathedral Square. I remember that invariably, when I returned a few days later to get the verdicts, Mr. Fiecchi repeated himself saying “these hand overprints are much more rare than we are made to believe, you should visit Commendator Mondolfo in Rome [publisher of the Sassone catalogue and an avid Fiume specialist] to add this variant and that one and that one, all unlisted and extremely rare, to the Sassone listings”. These hand overprints became necessary to recycle post office remainders that would not be suitable for the typographical system because of being in quarter sheets, multiples, blocks and even single stamps. This process was carried out during late 1918, and as a courtesy the public, and to gather up more old regime stamps for overprinting, the public could surrender them at the post office in exchange for the Fiume ones. Some of the hand overprints are truly rare and some are surrounded by mystery. The latter flourished on the failure of Antoniazzo and Riccotti to publish a second edition of their listings and research that were supposed to include all the relevant information on these hand overprints and their sub-types. This remains a rather important missing piece of the puzzle. The next chapter delves into nuances, old controversies plagued with philatelic convenience, and printed quantities. The section devoted to forged overprints of the early issues is exhaustive and the main focus is on the truly dangerous imitations that can fool even the most advanced collectors. Postal stationery is discussed in great detail and then we go on with the Pictorial series and the various types of paper used to print it, plus plate flaws, as well as printed quantities. The Students’ Education Fund issue is next, followed by a very informative chapter on currency and bank notes. Valuable information also comes from the section devoted to the re-organization of the postal service where we also learn about postal money orders, parcel post and their forms. The chapter on postal rates is very useful and well articulated and the same can be said of the one on postmarks, date stamps, as well as labels for registered and express mail. Emoroso reserves a lot of his energies to shed more light on field post offices operating in the region and their handling and censorship; the same applies to mail from sailors of the Royal Navy as well as the mails from the USA, French, and British Forces stationed in the area. The arrival of d’Annunzio and his Legionari had its philatelic impact, beginning with the Valore Globale overprints on the earlier mentioned Students’ Education Fund stamps. Then came the stamps denominated in Italian currency and featuring the head turned left of d’Annunzio himself. The Lira was not yet the legal tender in Fiume, for that to happen it took years (March 1924); it was, however, used as an accounting currency, and Italian coins were gradually seeing more circulation. The Legionari issues and overprints are examined in great detail and no less than 60 pages are devoted to them. The Provisional Government and the New Constitution overprints get their share of attention. The final pages of this veritable tour de force examine the St. Vitus pictorial series of 1923 and its overprints of 1924 to announce Fiume’s Annexation to Italy. This authoritative and readable volume is lavishly produced with hundreds of high quality illustrations; it is ideal for the beginner, irrespective of his language, and even the most advanced collector will benefit from it as a reference and a source of information that is otherwise scattered over dozens of stamp magazines and catalogues. No matter at what level of Fiume collecting you are, you will find this book to be indispensable. [Review by Giorgio Migliavacca] ******************** VERY IMPORTANT * WHEN BUYING THIS BOOK IGNORE THE AUTOMATIC $10 charge [we will send you a Paypal invoice or equivalent for the exact amount] -THIS IS a 5 Pounds PACKET- *** SHIPPING COSTS: TO USA $24 ** TO CANADA $43 ** TO OTHER COUNTRIES IN THE AMERICAS & EUROPE $55 ** AFRICA, AUSTRALIA, ASIA & FAR EAST $65 **********************
Price: $120.00
Item Id #011493    See Details...
 ITALY POSTAL STATIONERY HIGGINS & GAGE CATALOG
Country: ITALY
Condition: ITALY POSTAL STATIONERY HIGGINS & GAGE CATALOG
Description: 33 Original Pages including Occupations * POST OFFICE ABROAD * EAST AFRICA * ITALIAN LEVANT * ALBANIA FIRST ITALIAN SETTLEMENTS ************************************ We are offering the pages of SINGLE COUNTRIES from a used set in good condition. They have punch holes at left to fit appropriate 3-ring binders - no binder is included in this lot. THE PAGES (UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED) are ORIGINAL PAGES from the Second and Last edition of the 1980s -- they ARE NOT PHOTOCOPIES Higgins & Gage, World Postal Stationery Catalogue, the definitive work on postal stationery issues of the world. HIGGINS & GAGE is to postal stationery what Scott, Michel, Yvert Tellier and Stanley Gibbons are to stamps. You will find listings for all Postal Cards, Letter Cards, Envelopes, Letter Sheets, Wrappers, Aerogrammes, Telephone Forms, Registry, Special Delivery, Pneumatic Post, Parcel Post, COD, Post Office Forms, Insurance, Receipts, Franked Envelopes and much more information. In English, priced in US $. VERY USEFUL WIKIPEDIA describes the Higgins and Gage opus as "the only encyclopaedic catalogue of POSTAL STATIONERY covering the whole world. Despite most volumes not having been updated for over twenty years, the catalogue and the H & G numbering system are still widely used by philatelists and stamp dealers as although the values given in the catalogue are out of date, there is no other comprehensive listing of world postal stationery."
Price: $21.00
Item Id #013718    See Details...
COMPENDIO DI STORIA DELLE POSTE IN ITALIA DALL'ANTICHITA' AL TERZO MILLENNIO
Country: ITALY
Condition: COMPENDIO DI STORIA DELLE POSTE IN ITALIA DALL'ANTICHITA' AL TERZO MILLENNIO
Description: ESSENZIALE PER LO STUDIOSO DI STORIA POSTALE *** IN ITALIAN 144 A4 pages illustrated Color Throughout ** Perfect Bound ** lengthy indexes [Names; Places; Topics] * Extensive Selected Biography * Introduction by CLEMENTE FEDELE ********* THE ENGLISH EDITION WILL BE PUBLISHED IN AUTUMN 2016 ********* 2,200 years of Italian postal history are examined in this volume in a compendium format aimed at those who have an interest in this often underestimated facet of economic and communications history. It provides the basic information in a concise way, giving a bird’s-eye view which will appeal to the scholar, researcher, academician, and collector. From Savoy to Sicily and Malta, from Avignon to Constantinople, from Venice to Crimea,Crete, Syria the postal history of the Italian States and Kingdoms is narrated in a chronological way, showing the progress made by postal communications from antiquity to the inception of the third millennium. This book is the first of its kind published during the last 100 years; it benefits from the latest and best research carried out on Italian and European archival sources and from the best printed sources, as well as fifty years of untiring interest and research on the part of the author. Myths, misconceptions and erroneous information passed on by earlier printed sources (from the 1600s to date) are discussed and placed in the proper perspective. The book opens with a preface by one of the top five Italian postal history scholars and includes very detailed indexes, interesting appendixes, and a comprehensive bibliography. The academician, the newcomer and the specialized researcher will benefit from this compendium.
Price: $44.00
Item Id #013725    See Details...
Postal History of the Italian Mail Steamers in the Mediterranean – 1840 - 1850 – Vol. II
Country: ITALY
Condition: Postal History of the Italian Mail Steamers in the Mediterranean – 1840 - 1850 – Vol. II
Description: Postal History of the Italian Mail Steamers in the Mediterranean – 1840 - 1850 – Vol. II ***************** ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Storia della Navigazione a Vapore e dei Servizi Postali sul Mediterraneo, Vol. II — 1840- by Alessandro Arseni. Published 2016. Perfect bound 8 1/2” x 11 3/4”, card cover, 192 pages, in Italian; colour and black and white illustrations, maps and charts throughout. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> POSTAGE FOR BUYERS IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN USA IS AS FOLLOWS: WHEN YOU RECEIVE THE INVOICE FOR YOUR PURCHASE THERE WILL BE $10 CHARGE FOR POSTAGE TO USA - FOR OTHER DESTINATIONS THE FOLLOWING COSTS MUST BE ADDED TO THE $10 INITIALLY CHARGED: TO CANADA & EUROPE $15 (+$10 of course) --- TO CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA $25 (+10 of course) --- TO THE REST OF THE WORLD $30 (+$10 of course) :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: In the first volume of this series, the author stressed that 1839 was a turning point in the history of Italian Mail Steamers. The importance of their service increased exponentially during the 1840s and 1850s, and French, British and Austrian competitors prompted the Italian operators to offer a reliable, flexible and timely conveyance of mail and passengers. These were the years when the world was rapidly getting smaller and the Mediterranean even more so. The second volume of this impressive series on the history and postal history of the Italian Steam Packets operating in the Mediterranean deals with the history of steamships of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies and of the Grand-Duchy of Tuscany during the decade from 1840 to 1850. Their role in the conveyance of mails of various States to destinations in the Mediterranean, including the islands of Corsica, Malta and Sicily is the focus of the volume. During these years the steamship fleet of King Ferdinand II was enlarged, and privately owned steam navigation companies also strengthened their presence and capabilities. This scenario offered more reliability, choice and flexibility for the prompt conveyance of an increasing volume of mail that could be expedited like never before, thanks to the absence of many of the obstacles, borders and complexities typical of overland routes. Amongst other things we learn too of the growth and demise of Tuscan steamship navigation, as well as the story of the Valery Bros. Steam Packet Company which monopolized the sea route between Bastia and Livorno. The era of uprisings era spanning the years 1848 and 1849 has been painstakingly examined by Arseni, thus providing reliable and detailed information about the steam packets utilized to convey mail between Naples and Sicily during the months of the Sicilian insurgency. There are many echoes of economic and political history in this book; one shining example is the Livorno-built steamship Il Lombardo which in 1860 transported many of Garibaldi’s “Thousand” to Sicily for the epic liberation of the South. The steamer ran aground at Marsala where it was welcomed by the cannon ballsof King Bomba’s army: the rest is history. Arseni’s work relies on extensive research carried out on 21,500 letters, and includes 600 footnotes, plus a most impressive picture gallery of 85 scholarly described letters, as well as fundamental documentation such as Treaties, Postal Conventions, and Decrees that had a direct impact on the postal activities of steam packets. This unprecedented wealth of information benefits from hitherto unpublished documents and research; Volume II is definitely a substantial contribution to the history and postal history of Italian Steam Packet Mail in the Mediterranean. Both the specialist and the general collector of maritime mail will greatly profit from Arseni’s books. [Review by Giorgio Migliavacca]
Price: $94.00
Item Id #013935    See Details...
ITALY: ROMAGNE ROMAN STATES Postmarks 1700s to 1880
Country: ITALY
Condition: ITALY: ROMAGNE ROMAN STATES Postmarks 1700s to 1880
Description: THE ROMAGNE POSTMARKS FROM PRE-ADHESIVES TO 1880s I BOLLI DELLE ROMAGNE By Mario Gallenga (1968) This is the elusive PART 1 of the Gallenga series on Papal States postmarks, which is missing in most sets of this series. In Italian, 160 pp, illustrated throughout, with evaluations. It includes introductions on the early posts, use of regular and accessory postmarks, as well as much useful information and research - DISINFECTED MAIL AND HEALTH AUTHORITIES MARKS AND STAMPERS ARE ALSO INCLUDED AND given a market value - THIS BOOK AFTER 40 YEARS REMAINS THE STANDARD REFERENCE FOR THE POSTMARKS OF THE AEMILIA AND BOLOGNA REGION POSTMARKS A most useful book with lots of information; easy to use even for those who know little or no Italian. Long out of print and RARE THIS IS A MUST HAVE bibliophile publication. A Special Item FROM THE ANTIQUARIAN & MODERNARIAN OF POSTAL HISTORY & PHILATELY
Price: $75.00
Item Id #014014    See Details...
I FRANCOBOLLI ITALIANI * FEDERICO ZERI *
Country: ITALY
Condition: I FRANCOBOLLI ITALIANI * FEDERICO ZERI * "The Italian stamps - Graphics and ideology from the origins to 1948"
Description: 86 pages (10.5 x 16 cm) - over 100 illustrations - Paperback - 1993 FIRST EDITION!!! In Italian **** Italian art historian Federico Zeri offers a new way to look at the stamps of Italy for those who want to go beyond the simple vignette of the stamp and get a higher appreciation of the artistry of stamp design. Originally part of the 1980 great opus "Italian Art History" published by Einaudi, the essay by Federico Zeri entitled "The Italian stamps - Graphics and ideology from the origins to 1948" has become a solid reference for those who like to learn more about Italian stamps, and in the process reach a much higher level of their appreciation of them, beyond the philatelic platform to the level of stamps as an art form. He also delves into the use of stamps as a propaganda tool, and examines the conciseness of the message and of the design which in a number of cases is not as simple as it may appear. Federico Zeri (1921-1998), goes beyond appearances examining stamp design and choice o colors, as well as printing techniques from the Italian States to the early years of the Italian Republic. Thanks to his long stay in England and USA, his international reputation as a great art connoisseur made Zeri the most famous and respected Italian art historian in the world,
Price: $35.00     Sale Price! $30.00
Item Id #014015    See Details...
GREECE ITALY IONIAN ISLANDS OVERPRINTS 1941-1943
Country: IONIAN ISLANDS
Condition: GREECE ITALY IONIAN ISLANDS OVERPRINTS 1941-1943
Description: in English - by MOSES CONSTANTINIS, reference work often cited by all later works -- reprint of the 1964 research paper with quite a few color illustrations, 24 pp - quite rare- Seminal work very useful, and required reading for the specialist THIS IS A MUST HAVE bibliophile publication. ********** ALSO CONSIDER BUYING LOT 3425 and LOT 3768 - look at these before you finalise your order
Price: $24.00
Item Id #003300    See Details...
IONIAN ISLANDS ITALY OCCUPATION & FORGERIES ATHEN
Condition: IONIAN ISLANDS ITALY OCCUPATION & FORGERIES ATHEN
Description: ******************** ALSO CONSIDER BUYING LOT 3300 and LOT 3768 - look at these before you finalise your order ************* IONIAN ISLANDS ITALIAN OCCUPATION, 1941 LETTERPRESS OVERPRINTS, by Piero Penco, in Italian: CEFALONIA E ITACA, OCCUPAZIONE MILITARE ITALIANA —reprint of Penco’s research with detailed synopsis in English by Dr. Migliavacca, plus two articles by Guglielmo Oliva, one on the ATHENS FORGERIES published in 1942, and the other on the quantities of these issues destroyed in Rome in July 1942. Both articles have an abstract in English. All this first hand information has never been available before to the English-speaking collectors. Much valuable information, many illustrations and enlargements of the overprints have been added to Penco’s work. 28 pages, incl. 2 maps. Quite rare, limited edition for the specialist and bibliopole.- Seminal work very useful, and required reading for the specialist. While the quality of the printing is good, the original printing was typical of the 1950s-1960s. On the whole this is a good readable and clear print with reasonably good pictures. If you expect perfect printing do not buy this item. On the other hand, if you are not a perfectionist, then the information is valuable, and this booklet is very useful. THIS IS A MUST HAVE bibliophile publication.
Price: $27.00
Item Id #003425    See Details...
THE TASSIS IMPERIAL POSTMASTERS IN VENICE
Country: ITALY
Condition: THE TASSIS IMPERIAL POSTMASTERS IN VENICE: 1500s to 1700s
Description: PLEASE READ THE REVIEW ****
Price: $90.00     Sale Price! $85.00
Item Id #014131    See Details...
AEROFILATELIA ITALIANA CATALOGO by CORSARI & DE SIMONI
Country: Italy
Condition: AEROFILATELIA ITALIANA CATALOGO by CORSARI & DE SIMONI
Description: RARE BOOK ON ITALIAN AIRMAIL 1784-1940, IN ITALIAN, PUBLISHED IN 1972 230 pages compiled by two top specialists as a chronology with all relevant information, illustrated throughout in black & white - MISSING IN MOST PHILATELIC LIBRARIES
Price: $80.00
Item Id #014444    See Details...
MARITIME MAIL OF THE TYRRHENIAN SEA by UMBERTO DEL BIANCO
Country: Italy
Condition: MARITIME MAIL OF THE TYRRHENIAN SEA by UMBERTO DEL BIANCO
Description: LE COMUNICAZIONI POSTALI MARITTIME DEL MAR TIRRENO - 270 A4 pages, in ITALIAN, hundred of illustrations in black and white and a good amount of color illustrations - published 2016 ** FRENCH MARITIME SERVICES * PORTS OF THE TYRRHENIAN SEA AND MARITIME POSTAL SERVICES 1830s-1860s * NAPLES * LEGHORN * CIVITAVECCHIA * GENOA-LEGHORN LINE * MARITIME MAIL CONVEYED BY ITALIAN POSTAL ADMINISTRATION * VALERY FRERES LINES * FLORIO LINES * BENUCCI & CALABRO SICULA * THE GENOESE RIVIERA * MARITIME POSTAL COMMUNICATIONS WITH SARDINIA *** LIMITED EDITION
Price: $145.00
Item Id #014445    See Details...
ITALY FRANCE 1915-1919 FRENCH TROOPS IN ITALY BY TRAPNELL
Country: ITALY
Condition: ITALY FRANCE 1915-1919 FRENCH TROOPS IN ITALY BY TRAPNELL
Description: A Special Item FROM THE ANTIQUARIAN & MODERNARIAN OF POSTAL HISTORY & PHILATELY THE POSTAL HISTORY OF THE FRENCH IN ITALY 1915-1919 & THE FRENCH MILITARY MISSION 38 pages A4 full color, illustrated throughout, spiral bound LOADED WITH VALUABLE INFORMATION
Price: $34.00
Item Id #002617    See Details...
ITALY SPAIN ITALIAN FORCES IN SPAIN CIVIL WAR 1936-9
Condition: ITALY SPAIN ITALIAN FORCES IN SPAIN CIVIL WAR 1936-9
Description: ITALY SPAIN ITALIAN FORCES IN SPAIN'S CIVIL WAR 1936-39 by Cadioli & Cecchi, in Italian with rarity scale and evaluations. 350 pages many illustrations, chronology, organisation of FPOs, shipping, rates, free franks, mail from Legionari POWs, Posta Speciale 500, stamps and postmarks, checking the mails, consular post at Tangeri, ` FPOs POSTA SPECIALE, MIS mails of MISSIONE ITALIANA, extensive bibliography - this book is over 2 lbs in weight - THE DEFINTIVE WORK & A MUST HAVE!!! almost as new L'INTERVENTO ITALIANO NELLA GUERRA CIVILE SPAGNOLA 1936-1936 - di Cadioli & Cecchi - volume pregevolissimo ed indispensabile - CON VALUTAZIONI - quasi come nuovo WE SHIP WORLDWIDE
Price: $84.00
Item Id #003398    See Details...
ITALY GERMANY ADRIA ALPENWORLAND KUSTENLAND 1943-1945
Condition: ITALY GERMANY ADRIA ALPENWORLAND KUSTENLAND 1943-1945
Description: IN ITALIAN (2001 first and only edition) 21 cm x 29 cm - 288 pages - hundreds of black & white illustrations including maps, virtually new GERMAN FELDPOST IN THE ADRIA & ALPENWORLAND DEUTSCHE DIENSTPOST ALPENWORLAND GERMAN POSTAL SERVICE & FELDPOST IN THE ADRIA REGION very easy to use despite the language barrier not to be missed
Price: $62.00
Item Id #003409    See Details...
FIUME POSTAL HISTORY & STAMPS by Ciullo - 210 pages
Country: FIUME
Condition: FIUME POSTAL HISTORY & STAMPS by Ciullo - 210 pages
Description: FIUME: COMPENDIUM OF POSTAL HISTORY & STAMP ISSUES FROM THE ORIGINS TO THE 1920s 210 pages, in Italian, illustrated throughout Compendium of information published in a long series of articles from the 1920s to the 21st century. The Author has added his personal reasearch and his ability of presenting the subject matter in a clear fashion shows throughout this important work which is essential reading for anyone who collects Fiume's stamps and Postal History Postal History and Postmarks from origins to 1918 Fiume and the Croat Occupation Allied Occupation Provisional Issue The Fiume post during the allied occupation - FIRST ISSUE Currency and postal rates Second Period: Pictorial and Allegories Series; Military Mail FPOs; Mail from Air Force and Navy D'Annunzio Stamps: Arbe, Veglia Free State : Governo Provvisorio stamps; Costituente Fiumana issue San Vito Stamps, Annessione etc The Author touches on the subject of FORGERIES in most of the Seven Chapters of this book . WE SHIP WORLDWIDE HANDLING & POSTAGE: TO USA — FREE SHIPPING TO ALL OTHER DESTINATIONS via AIRMAIL (only) : 8.00
Price: $80.00     Sale Price! $59.00
Item Id #001854    See Details...
PERFINS ITALY 2009 EDITION WITH CD & TRANSPARENCIES
Condition: PERFINS ITALY 2009 EDITION WITH CD & TRANSPARENCIES
Description: 2009 EXPANDED REVISED IMPROVED EDITION WITH EVALUATIONS BILINGUAL TEXT: ITALIAN & ENGLISH 300 pages, illustrated throughout in black & white CD with 608 colour scans of postal items franked with Italian Perfins 32 TRANSPARENCIES with 1107 actual size OUTLINES of the perfins that will allow you to superimpose to covers and stamps to identify the correct type of your perfin PLEASE READ THE ITALIAN & ENGLISH INTRODUCTION to get more details WE SHIP WORLDWIDE
Price: $93.00     Sale Price! $63.00
Item Id #003400    See Details...
AUSTRIA ITALY LOMBARDY VENETIA CAPELLARO COLLECTION
Country: LOMBARDY-VENETIA
Condition: AUSTRIA ITALY LOMBARDY VENETIA CAPELLARO COLLECTION
Description: LOMBARDY-VENETIA FIRST ISSUE: THE CAPELLARO COLLECTION LOMBARDO-VENETIEN—CENTESIMI AUSGABE: DIE CAPELLARO COLLECTION LOMBARDO-VENETO PRIMA EMISSIONE: LA COLLEZIONE CAPELLARO 260 pp. - 600 illustrations FULL COLOR— HARDBOUND DELUXE, LAVISH PRODUCTION in ITALIAN * ENGLISH * GERMAN La Collezione Emil Capellaro e’ a dir poco leggendaria: fu formata negli anni 70 e 80 quando le maggiori collezioni di Lombardo Veneto furono vendute sia privatamente che all’asta. Tra le acquisizioni importanti che Capellaro fece in quegli anni rientra la raffinata collezione di uno studioso di Pavia. Vengono qui presentati tutti i pezzi (oltre 600) della collezione Capellaro. La presentazione e’ divisa nel modo tradizionale: Francobolli Tipo, Multipli, varieta’ ecc. — ANNULLAMENTI—AFFRANCATURE— AFFRANCATURE MISTE—MARCHE DA BOLLO USATE PER POSTA—SEGNATASSE PER GIORNALI The legendary Capellaro Collection was formed in the 1970s and ‘80s when some of the major Lombardy Venetia collections came on the market, including the famous Rivolta collection. Capellaro also bought extremely impressive collections of Lombardy Venetia directly from specialists, these include an outstanding Lombardy Venetia collection formed in the 1930s-50s by a Pavia collector. The entire Capellaro collection is presented here (over 600 breathtaking items) in the traditional manner: 1st Issues, Various Denominations: varieties, multiples etc; CANCELLATIONS—FRANKINGS—MIXED FRANKINGS—REVENUE STAMPS POSTALLY USED—POSTAGE DUE FOR NEWSPAPERS -- A MUST HAVE BOOK
Price: $92.00     Sale Price! $69.00
Item Id #003422    See Details...
TRIESTE POLA FIUME ISTRIA SLOVENE LITTORAL 1945-47
Country: TRIESTE
Condition: TRIESTE POLA FIUME ISTRIA SLOVENE LITTORAL 1945-47
Description: TRIESTE, POLA, FIUME, ISTRIA & SLOVENE LITTORAL UNDER YUGOSLAV ADMINISTRATION: 1945-1947 STAMPS & POSTAL HISTORY BY DAMIR NOVAKOVIC Hardbound; 912 pages (17 cm x 24 cm); hundres of colour illustrations; IN ENGLISH with evaluations plating charts; Historical & Political Background POLA: Provisional Issue & Postal History TRIESTE: Provisional Issue & Postal History TRIESTE ZONE B & FIUME: 1945-1847 Provisional Issues & Postal History AIRMAIL * CENSORSHIP * MILITARY MAIL * STAMPLESS MAIL POSTAL STATIONERY * POSTAL RATES PLATING OF STAMPS & OVERPRINTS PLATING DICTIONARY PLACE NAMES CROAT SLOVENE ITALIAN APPENDIX MONETARY SYSTEM MAPS WITH POST OFFICES LOCATIONS You name it; this book got it beware: from 1945 to 1947 VERY HEAVY TO SHIP * WE SHIP ONLY BY AIRMAIL (allow 4 to 8 weeks for postal delivery)
Price: $140.00     Sale Price! $99.00
Item Id #003434    See Details...
TRIESTE BETWEEN ALLIES & CLAIMANTS AMG VG ETC
Country: TRIESTE
Condition: TRIESTE BETWEEN ALLIES & CLAIMANTS AMG VG ETC
Description: In Italian - Published in 1999, long out of print - 176 pages - A4 size - with lots of illustrations - very useful, well documented, well research INDISPENSABLE TO THE COLLECTOR OF THE 1944-1954 TRIESTE POSTAL HISTORY & STAMPS GERMAN DIENST POST TRIESTE RED STAR ON VENEZIA GIULIA SOCIAL REPUBLIC STAMPS USED IN TRIESTE AMG VG OVERPRINTS (postal history & varieties) * FREE TERRITORY OF TRIESTE & ITS STAMPS IN DEPTH POST OFFICES OF VENETIA JULIA & ISTRIA 1943-1954 POSTAL RATES * FIELD POST OFFICES & APOs
Price: $65.00     Sale Price! $49.00
Item Id #001930    See Details...
DISINFECTED MAIL EUROPE & MEDITERRANEAN AREA: ITALY ONLY
Condition: DISINFECTED MAIL ITALY ONLY
Description: DISINFECTED MAIL Storia della Disinfezione Postale in Europa e nell’area mediterranea - History of the mail disinfection in Europe and Mediterranean area by Luciano De Zanche. 200 pages, 8” x 11 1/2”, many illustrations throughout including color. Perfect bound. 2008 Edition based on the 1997 edition This book is pre-eminently in Italian, but some history background is given in English; and most chapters have a good introduction in English; the technical information is also translated into English. Contrary to what the title of this book may lead you to believe, this monograph deals solely with the disinfection of mails within the Italian peninsula. CONTRARY TO WHAT IS SAID IN THE REVIEW BELOW NO PRICES ARE GIVEN for Disinfection marks It is quite possible that the Author may have thought of this as volume one of a series; unfortunately Professore De Zanche died recently leaving the task of completing the research at a European level to the next generation of postal historians. In dealing with the Italian peninsula De Zanche lavished a considerable amount of information and although the main text is in Italian, many key items are also explained in English in concise but clear and useful abstracts. After examining the approach of medical science on plague, yellow fever and cholera, the Author devotes a chapter to explain why letters and mail in general were subjected to disinfection procedures in times of epidemics. For those who may think that this procedure is a rather empiric and primitive precaution taken in the dark ages, suffice it to say that modern treatment, against smallpox in German and Austrian military hospitals in both World Wars, and the use of autoclaves in leper colonies dates back only a few decades from our days and age. The methods of mail disinfection are examined in great detail and this chapter, like most of the others, is replete with lengthy footnotes. De Zanche answers the frequently asked questions (FAQs) on when and where mail was disinfected, and how the collector or specialist can recognize a “disinfected” letter. On finer points the Author also delves into ways and means of assessing the type of disinfection used to sanitize a certain piece of mail. Multiple disinfection at different points in transit and on arrival are well researched. The catalogue of cachets, seals and notations includes listings for the Republic of Venice, Genoa, Tuscany, the Kingdom of Sardinia, Nice, Lombardy & Venetia, Modena and Reggio, Parma, the Duchy of Lucca, the Papal States, the Kingdom of Naples and Two Sicilies, and finally, San Marino. Adequate references are given for areas that changed their geo-political status as a result of wars, treaties, and revolutions. Controversy being the spice of life, this valuable and exceedingly interesting book is not exempt from it. In introducing his chapter on the Republic of Venice the Author uses much of the information he had divulged in his article for the Postal History Journal [No. 105, 1966 - Republic of Venice: The Disinfection of the Sea Mail coming from the Levant]; in doing so De Zanche finds himself on a collision course with noted Swiss postal history expert Paolo Vollmeier who deems some of the Venetian disinfection marks “stupid marks stamped by the faker”. This material has come under suspicion in the past and De Zanche concedes that some of the seals and hand stamps may prove to be bogus; only new and conclusive evidence can establish their status. In many respects this new book supersedes the pioneer research by Ravasini and Meyer, at least for the Italian area. In comparing De Zanche’s work with the standard reference published by the A.I.S.P. [Bolli e Documenti di Sanita’ dell’area Italiana - Rome 1981] the former has the decidedly apparent advantage of a more scholarly and scientific approach (notwithstanding the leaner listings of notations and hand stamps strictly related to mail disinfection). Furthermore De Zanche has by far surpassed all of his predecessors with time-consuming research on primary sources, unearthing a sizable amount of previously unpublished information. Additionally, the catalogue is cross referenced with Meyer, Ravasini and AISP numbers, which simplifies the task of the specialist; the Author has, however, decided to include a valuation chart to help assess a monetary value for this material. We have mixed feelings about the need for such a chart and we would have rather preferred that the Author had left the task of putting a price to this material to the postal history “merchants” and the auction houses. The footnotes are placed at the bottom of each page and not confined at the end of each chapter, or worse yet, at the end of the book as an appendix, as is often the case with academic works. A very comprehensive bibliography is the crowning point of this major and scholarly effort in divulging this fascinating aspect of postal communications. Given the limited appeal of this book to a relatively small number of specialists we empathize with the Author/Publisher about production costs. Anyone interested in disinfected mail must secure a copy of this book before it’s out of print as we understand it had a very small print run. [review by GIORGIO MIGLIAVACCA] THIS IS A MUST HAVE bibliophile publication. rather heavy and large book -
Price: $145.00     Sale Price! $115.00
Item Id #004244    See Details...
LOMBARDY VENETIA 10 CENTES FIRST ISSUE 1850 new!!
Country: LOMBARDY VENETIA
Condition: LOMBARDY VENETIA 10 CENTES FIRST ISSUE 1850 new!!
Description: LOMBARDY-VENETIA FIRST ISSUE: 10 CENTES. by Ferroni & Serone 150 pages * 17 x 24 cm IN ITALIAN AND ENGLISH HUNDREDS OF ILLUSTRATIONS INCLUDING COLOUR IN DEPTH STUDY OF THIS STAMP INCLUDING POSTAL USE AS WELL AS ALL POSSIBLE VARIATIONS AND VARIETIES A MUST FOR THE SPECIALIST WE SHIP ONLY BY AIRMAIL (allow 4 to 8 weeks for postal delivery)
Price: $88.00     Sale Price! $68.00
Item Id #011956    See Details...
 ROMAN STATES: THE FIRST STAMPS IN ROME
Country: PAPAL STATES
Condition: ROMAN STATES: THE FIRST STAMPS IN ROME ROMAN STATES: THE FIRST STAMPS IN ROME
Description: Stamp Exhibition Catalogue, Braschi Palace, Rome, 1978 ************ In Italian (with French, German, English introduction), 180 A4 pages, hardbound, replete with gorgeous illustrations (color and black and white) - LAVISH PRODUCTION. Long out of print - THE POSTAGE STAMPS INTRODUCED DURING THE PAPACY OF PIOUS IX * THE FRENCH ARMY UNITS IN ROME * THE FIRST ISSUE * THE 20 BAJ ESSAY * SHEETS OF THE FIRST ISSUE * BISECTED STAMPS * SENIGALLIA’S POSTAL HISTORY * MULTIPLES, BLOCKS, VARIETIES, FORGERIES TO DEFRAUD THE POST OFFICE * RARE POSTMARKS * MIXED FRANKINGS: ITALY-ROMAN STATES * THE CENTESIMI DENOMINATED ISSUE * MIXED FRANKING AFTER 20 SEPTEMBER 1870 * If you collect Italian States this book is a must, besides, it’s a joy to behold and a bargain
Price: $86.00     Sale Price! $58.00
Item Id #002492    See Details...
ITALY OCCUPATION WORLD WAR 2 FRANCE GREECE ALBANIA
Country: ITALY
Condition: ITALY OCCUPATION WORLD WAR 2 FRANCE GREECE ALBANIA
Description: ITALIAN OCCUPATIONS WWII Occupazioni ed Annessioni Italiane nella Seconda Guerra Mondiale - Albania, Francia, Grecia, Jugoslavia - 1939-1943 La Posta Civile by Valter Astolfi. Published March 1996 by Fiorenzo Zanetti Editore, Milan. 640 pages, several maps; 6 1/2” x 9 1/2”; black and white illustrations throughout. Perfect bound. [Limited edition of Hardbound copies exist - ask for more details] A REVIEW BY GIORGIO MIGLIAVACCA (copyright) Quite a few volumes have been published during the last two decades about Italian military mail of World War II; most of them were well received both by reviewers and the collecting public. Some of their success story is contributed by the information given on the exact location of the various field post offices — a very important detail for postal history collectors of the various countries and territories occupied by Italy. Another crucial factor is that Italian military mail of WWII is still in relatively large supply, and although stocks and trouvailles had been cherry-picked in the 1950s and early 1960s by pioneering specialists, chances of an occasional lucky find keep collectors’ adrenaline going. Once occupied and/or annexed the various territories and countries had to be governed, sometime by a civilian administration, sometime by military rule, and in some instances by a combination of both, depending on circumstances which had strategic, political and diplomatic ramifications. The postal service for civilians was a rather important aspect of public administration and the plethora of occupation stamps listed by the various catalogues is, for the serious specialist or postal historian, the classical “tip of the iceberg”. In some of the occupied territories definitive stamps of Italy were used, in other places specific overprinted stamps were issued, and in one case local definitives continued in use. In each case the adopted course had been influenced by circumstances, and although some mistakes were made, Italy was quite careful not to step on Germany’s toes while devising some long-term policy as to better incorporate the newly acquired territories without hurting local sensitivities and pride. Germany, on the other hand, had none of these complexities to contend with and her approach was - to put it in one word - rather brutal. On the whole, war cover enthusiasts will find this collecting field quite exciting and challenging. On 10 June 1940, Mussolini issued declarations of war against Britain and France; as a result Italian troops began to occupy bordering areas on the western front. Two weeks later France had agreed to sign an armistice. The acquisitions were pitifully modest and included Mentone where Italian stamps were introduced by mid-March 1941. Additionally, as a result of the disruption of postal service between Italy and France, mail from Italians residing in France and her colonies were forwarded through special arrangements and concessions. Covers benefitting from such concessions are usually recognizable by official “straight line” hand-stamps. The partition of Yugoslavia after the annexation by the Axis powers resulted in the birth of two new countries, Croatia and Serbia, and the subdivision of the other areas into smaller entities under German or Italian rule. Southern Slovenia became the Province of Lubiana, the Italianized name of its main city, Ljubljana. Here the annexation caused no disruption of the postal service and Yugoslav stamps continued to be used for a short time. The Fiume-Kupa zone, in the vicinity of Fiume, included Arbe and Veglia - two of the nearby islands - and was eventually incorporated into the pre-existing Province of Fiume. Other acquisitions included the Dalmatian coast where the administrative subdivision included the provinces of Zadar (Zara), Split (Spalato) and the offshore islands, and Kotor (Cattaro). From a strictly philatelic point of view it is interesting to notice that Yugoslav stamps with an Italian (Co.Ci.) overprint were issued for Lubiana, and a similar measure was implemented for the Fiumano-Kupa zone. Montenegro followed a similar pattern but here there were some “sensitivities” that had to be carefully dealt with. Firstly, Queen Helena (nee Petrovic), the consort of King Victor Emmanuel III, was also a Montenegrin princess, and a special administrative arrangement had to be adopted. Therefore, on 3 October 1941 Mussolini issued a special decree making Montenegro an Italian Governorship. The special status of Montenegro under Italian occupation is also reflected by its stamps, which include a set commemorating Prince Bishop Petrovic Njegosh, author of the Montenegrin national poem. Each of the ten stamps bore a few lines of the poem inscribed on the back. Undoubtedly Queen Helena had a lot of influence in all of this; and having a famous Sicilian collector at the top of the newly established Governorship made things easier. In 1901 Italy opened a post office at Scutari; the following year two additional offices were opened at Janina and Durazzo (Durres) and in 1908 Valona (Vlone) also had its Italian post office. This was simply another indication of Italian long-term interest in the area. The 1913 Treaty of London gave independence to Albania; the stamps of the new country depicting Skander-Beg (also known as Gjergji Kastrioti) were printed by the Italian Government Printing Works in Turin. Following a period of anarchy and unrest during World War I, and with the help of Italy, the country stabilized itself. The cordial relationship with Rome improved as years went by, and quite a few pre-war stamp issues of Albania were printed by the Italian Government Printing Works which had by then moved to Rome. The situation deteriorated in 1939, when King Zog refused to align Albania with the Axis; Mussolini, who wouldn’t take no for an answer, occupied the country in a matter of days. On 12 April 1939 Victor Emmanuel III became King of Albania and Albanian stamps were overprinted at first, to be followed by definitives depicting the Italian monarch. The idea of overprinting Italian definitives was discarded because it would have met with stern resistance and incensed the Albanians whose national pride was well known. Instead, a definitive series blending the image of Victor Emmanuel with local pictorial elements and featuring Albanian inscriptions and currency was issued. The inevitable fasces were also a design element, but to circumvent local criticism many of the later issues also featured the Albanian coat of arms. Metropolitan postal rates were adopted and the use of Italian definitives was tolerated for about twelve months. In 1941 Albania expanded its boundaries at the expense of Yugoslavia. As a result some 15 post offices became part of the Albanian postal network. Covers with stamps of Albania under Italian rule cancelled by postmarks of these post offices are quite elusive, and even the advanced collector would never know what he is dealing with unless he has Astolfi’s book. After declaring war on Greece (28 October 1940), Italy found out that it was not an easy task and only in the spring of 1941 with massive help from Berlin the occupation was successfully completed. From a postal history point of view evidence of the Italian occupation on the mainland was only marginal. Stamps featuring King George II and/or members of the royal family were declared obsolete and withdrawn; however, all the other definitives remained in use. The only postal vestiges of the Italian occupation of Greece to be found on mails from civilians are the often bi-lingual (Italian and Greek) censor marks and labels. The approach with the offshore islands was quite different. In the Ionian Islands, at first, Greek stamps were overprinted locally at Corfù, Cephalonia, Ithaca, and Zante; then, in an attempt to wipe out even the minutest visual link with the mainland, Italian definitives overprinted “ISOLE JONIE” were introduced. On Crete and throughout the Cycladian and Sporades Islands Greek stamps were used. The occasional use of Italian and Rhodes’ definitives was only marginal. Astolfi makes a very good point when he discusses the Cephalonia and Ithaca overprints in used condition. As we all know the format of these rather large and clumsy overprints required two stamps to leave a full impression. The acquisitive mind of collectors combined with the money-grabbing attitude of most dealers resulted in marketing these issues as “pairs”. As such they have been catalogued and collected from day one, irrespective of evidence to the contrary; in fact, the overprint did not actually modify the face value of each stamp. It was simply an expedient method due to the emergency. For generations now, catalogues have been penalizing single stamps with half of the overprint, but the often rare pieces of mail of non-philatelic origin that have been recorded so far show clearly that the overprinted pairs were invariably separated to make up the required postal rates. Scott says that used halves (sic!) are worth 50% of their already ridiculously low-priced pair counterparts. Sassone, who should know better, adopts an even more absurd approach when it states that used “singles” (a more fitting description than halves) with half impression of the overprint are worth 10% of the price given for used pairs. However, Sassone says, such “singles” on cover are worth the same as pairs. Ironically enough, Sassone does not give prices for pairs on cover — a clear indication that the right hand does not know what the left hand is doing. Unsevered pairs are usually found on philatelic covers which can be easily recognized since they are invariably “over-paid” and do not reflect an actual postal rate of any kind. In this respect Astolfi’s book is a very valuable tool for spotting philatelic covers since he devotes detailed chapters to the various postal rates used in the occupied territories. What has just been said reminds us of what Walter G. Weisbecker wrote in 1958 in an article on WWII Occupation Overprints published by “Stamps” magazine (4 January): “The failure of the Scott catalogue to provide detailed listings of these occupation series (in particular, the recognized varieties and reasonable price quotations) is, in the final analysis, really a matter of no great importance except to the collector who relies upon it. Every leading European catalogue...carries the great majority of them as readily marketable items. Scott, I fear, is still struggling off to a very late start. Thus, assuming that you recognize that Scott is certainly no collector’s ‘bible’ in this field, the way lies open for you to probe a highly specialized, little known area that may well be as profitable as it is fascinating.” This is certainly a mouthful, especially knowing that it was said almost 40 years ago and that Scott has made little progress since then. What are the “shakers and movers” of the American philatelic world doing? Sleeping, we assume. By mid-1943 Hitler was already highly suspicious that the Italians were going to betray him. After Mussolini’s ousting (25 July) Italy signed an armistice with the Allies (8 September), followed by a declaration of war on Germany (13 October). German take-over of just about all territories and islands occupied by Italy was marked by a series of atrocities. Those perpretrated in Juguslavia and Greece have been widely publicised, but little has been said about the 5,000 Italians on Cephalonia put to death by the Germans after the surrender. The remaining 4,000 were embarked for Greece but their ships hit mines and sank. The few who jumped into the sea were machine-gunned by the Germans. Similar atrocities were committed in Corfu and Rhodes involving thousands. But Astolfi’s book does not deal with the German take-over and his postal history of civilian mails ends exactly on that fateful 8 September 1943. Astolfi hopes to tackle the postal history of civilian mails in former Italian territories taken over by Germany in a separate volume to be published at a later date. We wish him every success in this new venture. What Astolfi has provided for us in these 640 pages will keep us busy long enough for him to accomplish his new project. Astolfi is not one of Italy’s most prolific writers, but when he decides to put pen to paper he does so in the most authoritative fashion. This is all too evident in the volume under review which, interestingly enough, belongs to a new series appropriately named “Le Pietre Miliari” (The Milestones). What we have here is a monumental monograph filled with previously unpublished research. One only needs to look at the existing bibliography to realise how little had been written previously on the postal history of civilian mails from Italian Occupations of World War II. Each section has substantial chapters outlining the historical events, the administrative status, stamps and postal stationery, postal rates, post offices, postal service, postmarks, stampers, registration labels, and censorship. Additionally, for those who want to put a cash value on everything, Astolfi’s book also provides evaluations based on a point system. Stamp issues of the occupied territories are not the main objective of this publication; however, the clarity imparted by Astolfi to his listings and the added information gathered by him make this section alone worth buying this book. His approach is realistic and unbiased and, therefore, at times conflicting with time-honoured but not time-tested sources such as stamp catalogues. He sticks to the facts and as a postal historian his penchant for detail is never fastidiously boring. The reader’s reaction is quite often - “Oh, I didn’t know that”. Astolfi also gives clear exaustive explanations on various “too good to be true” bogus overprints; these include the 1940 “SOLLUM” overprints on stamps of Libya; the 1942 Siwa overprints (“OCCUPAZIONE ITALIANA” on two lines) on Egyptian definitives to celebrate the Axis counter-offensive in Libya; and the hilarious 1942 “TOBRUCH” overprints on the Rome-Berlin Axis stamps. Justifiably maligned, these stamps were also the target of another invention of forgers when a two line overprint “C.S.I.R. / VINCEREMO” (Italian Expeditionary Force in Russia / We will Win) was added to them by some practical joker. The bogus overprints of Santa Maura, Cerigo, and Paxo on Greek stamps; and the Lassithi (Crete) overprints on stamps of Rhodes are also discussed. The book requires a good knowledge of the Italian language, but don’t let this influence you because the many illustrations and the abundance of maps, charts, synoptic tables and Astolfi’s use of plain language will make your task rather easy. The information is carefully researched and well documented, and all the pertinent facts are discussed in a lucid style. If criticism, for the sake of criticism, must be made, then it may be said that an index would have been an added asset; but, quite honestly, the subject matter is arranged and organized in such a way that the lack of an index is only to the regret of the printer who would have benefitted from printing the few extra pages. From a practical point of view, most postal history material of these territories is far from common; additionally this collecting area is marred by dressed-up (philatelic) covers and outright forgeries. Putting all of these in the right contest and finding out their relevance and worth from a collecting point of view can be rewarding and can easily justify the purchase of this book. For the specialist, this is a veritable goldmine; you will go back to it time and again and you either purchase two copies (one for your bookshelf and one for research purposes and annotations) or you make sure you go to a bookbinder to give it a solid hardback. All the illustrations are crisp and clear, including maps and postmarks; the book is lavisly produced and is complimented by a dust jacket. From a commercial point of view, Fiorenzo Zanetti, the publisher, has been very generous because this is clearly “five books in one”. He could have easily serialized this “opus magnus” in five tomes, but then Fiorenzo comes from a family of collectors/dealers that has earned the highest accolades in Italian philately. This is his way to contribute to the hobby and we are very grateful. This book is a must for all philatelic libraries and for anyone interested in this rather difficult collecting area. — Giorgio Migliavacca (COPYRIGHT) VERY HEAVY BOOK TO SHIP
Price: $125.00     Sale Price! $91.00
Item Id #003315    See Details...