ARCHEOLOGY ALBA FUCENS ITALY 2013 MINT NEVER HINGED

$2.60

Country: ITALY

Condition: ARCHEOLOGY ALBA FUCENS ITALY 2013 MINT NEVER HINGED

Item Id #: 10666

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Description

On 30 November 2013, Italy issued a special stamp as part of the ongoing series focusing on Cultural and Artistic Heritage of Italy. The stamp depicts the Pillars Road (300 BC) at Alba Fucens, also known as Fucentia.
Alba Fucens is situated on the ancient Via Valeria near the Lake Fucino. Escavations carried out in the late 1940s and early 1950s in the area yielded the foundations of a Tuscan temple honouring Apollon, as well as traces of an amphitheatre. A colossal statue of Hercules and a small temple were also unearthed. External walls and fortifications are still in relatively good condition.
Livy describes Alba Fucens as Aequis’ territory. It owed its importance as a stronghold loyal to Rome. When Hannibal invaded Italy (211 BC), Alba sent 2000 men to Rome to fight against the invaders. As a result a Numidian king was imprisoned at Alba. Other famous figures imprisoned at Alba include: Perseus of Macedony, and a king of Avernus. During the early imperial era Alba Fucens enjoyed great prosperity. However, by the IVth Century, the decline of Rome severely affected the area resulting in a dramatic demographic drain. The situation did not improve throughout the Middle Ages as the entire region went from one ruler to the next.
Nowadays, Massa d’Albe (the modern name of Alba Fucens) has a population of 1,600 and attracts some 50,000 tourists per year and the Roman Amphitheatre is used regularly for cultural events, visual arts festivals, and classical music concerts.

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